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The true story behind the SAS operator in Kenya

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An undesirable flood of fame has fallen on the lone British Special Air Service (SAS) operator who reacted to last Tuesday’s terrorist attack in downtown Nairobi, Kenya. World headlines and various news outlets have speculated about his identity and outfit. At first, he was “identified” as a Navy SEAL from SEAL Team 3 because he wore a Velcro patch that ST3 SEALs have been seen wearing. But then – more accurately – he became an active-duty SAS operator. According to a source related to the NEWSREP, however, the SAS operator is, in fact, part of the British Territorial Army SAS – that is original, the reserve component of the famed Special Operations unit.

The 21 SAS and 23 SAS Regiments are garrisoned by civilian volunteers who have undergone SAS selection and training. They are independent units with senior officers and non-commissioned officers coming from the active-duty 22 SAS Regiment. Traditionally, the territorial SAS have conducted Special Reconnaissance (SR) and Foreign Internal Defense (FID) missions. Sometimes, however, individual territorial SAS operators have augmented their active-duty counterparts. These are part of L Detachment SAS, previously known as R Squadron, which is directly attached to 22 SAS Regiment.

The two special operation units had been part of the United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) since its inception in the late 1980s. However, a recent organizational restructure of the British Army brought them under the wing of the 1st Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Brigade in 2014. Still a SOF unit, they now focus more on SR and Human Environment Reconnaissance and Analysis (HERA) operations. Alongside these skill sets, they also conduct FID and advice and training missions.

The SAS operator who single-handedly stormed the DusitD2 hotel was in Kenya with the task of advising and training the local police and military counter-terrorist units. On a side note, during the terrorist attack, he was off-duty, but despite that, he assisted Kenyan special forces during the rescue operation.

The Territorial SAS Regiments have been mobilized for all the major conflicts in recent British history, including Falklands, Northern Ireland, the Balkans, the Gulf War, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

Moreover, the unnamed operator has been nominated for the George’s Cross, the second-highest award for valor in the British honors system and second only to the Victoria Cross, which is the British equivalent of the Medal of Honor.

The attack on the luxury hotel by the Somali militant group al-Shabaab, which is affiliated with notorious al-Qaeda, left 21 people dead, including an American citizen, and dozens wounded.

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Magpul PMAG D-50 brings the advantage to the firefight

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In the War on Terror, the mandatory for every soldier is to be well-equipped and to have enough ammunition for the firefight. Magpul Industries Corp. has introduced a bright new 7.62mm version of its high-capacity polymer drum magazine capable to hold 50 rounds of 7.62x51mm NATO/308. Winchester caliber.

The Magpul PMAG D-50 is designed to hold 50 rounds for SR25/M110 AR-style rifles. It follows the popular PMAG D-60 drum magazine for 5.56mm rifles. The D-50 features “proven GEN M3 technology, which includes next-generation impact and crush-resistant polymer construction and the ability to seat fully loaded on a closed bolt,” according to Magpul’s website.

The robust stainless-steel internal components are designed to withstand corrosion and long-term storage while loaded with no loss of function, spring fatigue, or reliability concerns. The introduction of the D-50 comes a week before popular SHOT Show 2019 in Las Vegas, Jan. 22-25.

The D-50 magazine weighs about 1.7 pounds empty and 4.5 pounds loaded, making it “one of the lightest 50-round 7.62mm drums available the website states.

And the D-50’s “unique drum configuration gives it roughly the same overall height profile as a standard 25-round 7.62mm PMAG, making storage easy and shooting from various positions — including prone — no different than with smaller capacity magazines,” the website states.

A special, ratcheting loading lever removes spring tension so the D-50 can be easily loaded by hand, the website states. The D-50 features an anti-glare translucent window on the rear of the drum for quick positive visual indication of remaining ammunition.

It can be disassembled quickly with a simple flat blade screwdriver or similar tool, and it comes with a dot-matrix pattern that allows for easy marking and identification, the website states.

The D-50 magazine retails for about $150 and is “coming soon,” according to Magpul’s website. It comes with a slip-on, semi-rigid dust cover to prevent grit and debris intrusion during storage and transport. It will be interesting to test it once it comes out to the market.

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Family, Fans Attend R. Lee Ermey’s Funeral at Arlington Cemetery

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ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY, Va. — Retired Marine Staff Sgt. R. Lee Ermey was driven at all stages of life and always brought an element of surprise to everything he did, according to those who spoke at his funeral.

His love of marksmanship and shooting started young, with family members recalling childhood target practice. At the age of 60, he tried to learn how to ride a unicycle.

These were some of the memories shared through tears and laughter on a very chilly Friday morning at snow-covered Arlington National Cemetery as Ermey — best known for playing Marine drill instructor Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in the film, “Full Metal Jacket” — was laid to rest with military honors nine months after he died.

“He put effort into everything he did,” recalled his son, Clint, after the ceremony.

“The Gunny” had a following: Nearly 100 friends, family and fans gathered to pay their respects to the Vietnam veteran. Ermey, 74, died in April due to complications from pneumonia.

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Dozens of Marines from 8th and I Barracks Washington, D.C., were present, serving as pallbearers, a firing party and an honorary platoon. A three-volley salute rang out before “Taps” was played on the edge of the cemetery, adjacent to the Old Post Chapel at Fort Myer.

In a few days, Ermey will be buried in the cemetery’s new Section 82, which opened in September. Headstones have yet to be placed for the dozen or so people already laid to rest there.

During the ceremony, two chaplains read Psalms 130 and 46 and honored his courage and commitment to the Corps. Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Ronald Green presented Ermey’s wife of 38 years, Nila, the folded flag.

Ermey had six children and 12 grandchildren. His children, Clint and Betty, and his last surviving brothers, Jack and Terry, talked of how “Ronny” was probably off on some new adventure in heaven.

Ermey was passionate about working with vets, added former Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Harold Overstreet, who spoke after Ermey’s brothers. He recalled how vets would ask Ermey to re-enact famous lines from “Full Metal Jacket.”

“And he loved it,” Overstreet said.

Ermey served 11 years in the Marine Corps, according to his online biography. Some of those were spent as a drill instructor at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego.

The Kansas native deployed to Vietnam in 1968 with Marine Wing Support Group 17, followed by two tours in Okinawa. Ermey medically retired as a staff sergeant after sustaining injuries.

He received an honorary promotion to gunnery sergeant in 2002 from then-Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James L. Jones.

“It is extremely difficult to truly quantify all of the great things this man has selflessly done for, and on behalf of, our many men and women in uniform,” Ermey’s long-time manager, Bill Rogin, said in a statement on Facebook when Ermey died.

“He has also contributed many iconic and indelible characters on film that will live on forever,” Rogin said. “He especially cared deeply for others in need.”

— Oriana Pawlyk can be reached at oriana.pawlyk@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @Oriana0214.

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MARSOC Operator Charged With Allegedly Punching His Girlfriend ‘Multiple Times’

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Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested on Jan. 29, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Wilmington Police Department, North Carolina.)

A special operations Marine is due in court on March 7 after being arrested last year for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend.

Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested and charged with assault inflicting serious injury on July 29, 2018, according to Jennifer Dandron, a spokeswoman for police in Wilmington, North Carolina. Evans is currently assigned as a Critical Skills Operator with the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, according to the Marine Corps Personnel Locator.

Wilmington Police took Evans into custody after responding to domestic assault, according to the police report, which was provided to Task & Purpose.

“Upon arrival, the victim was located with several injuries,” the report said. “She explained to officers on scene that Evans had punched her multiple times after asking him to leave the residence. Evans was arrested and charged with Assault Inflicting Serious Injury and was given no bond until his first appearance in court.”

Evans spent one day in jail and was released on Jan. 30, 2018 after posting $5,000 secured bail, according to the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office.

Police confirmed the alleged victim was Kimberly Rhine, who recently posted on Facebook that she had asked Evans to leave after claiming that she found he had been unfaithful during his seven-month deployment.

“My BF then punched me in the face completely knocking me off my feet,” Rhine posted. “My 6’3, 230+ LB. MARSOC operator boyfriend … split open my face.”

Now prosecutors are trying to strike a plea deal with Evans because this is allegedly his first offense, Rhine wrote. Sam Dooies, an assistant to the New Hanover County District Attorney, declined to comment on the status of the case.

MARSOC issued a statement on Friday confirming that a member of the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion is “accused of several crimes related to an alleged altercation in July 2018” without naming Evans.

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Another Navy SEAL Due in Court on War Crimes Case

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Chief Special Warfare Operator Edward R. Gallagher (Photo: Wiki)

U.S. Navy SEAL Lt. Jacob “Jake” Portier will be arraigned Tuesday in San Diego for allegedly failing to report war crimes committed by a fellow SEAL Edward Gallagher and other related offenses.

Portier is the second Navy SEAL to be charged in connection with the death of a wounded ISIS fighter in 2017 during the battle of Mosul. Chief Edward Gallagher is accused of killing the young man with a knife and then holding a reenlistment ceremony next to the fighter’s corpse.

The Navy SEAL officer is charged with dereliction of duty for allegedly failing to prevent Gallagher from wounding two non-combatants with a sniper rifle; failure to obey a lawful general order for not reporting an alleged war crime; obstruction of justice for allegedly destroying evidence; making false official statements for allegedly lying to his superior officers about Gallagher; and conduct unbecoming an officer for allegedly telling enlisted service members to pose for pictures with a human corpse.

Portier had also been accused of lying to cover up the death of the ISIS fighter, but a specification of misprision of a serious offense against him was dismissed.

At his Article 32 hearing in November, Portier’s attorney Jeremiah Sullivan argued that his client did in fact tell his chain of command what he knew about the allegations against Gallagher.

Sullivan told Task & Purpose that Portier is “a highly decorated combat veteran who served our country on the battlefield,” whom Sullivan looked forward to representing at trial.

Read the whole charge sheet here:

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Marines, Japanese Forces Begin Warfare Training at California Bases

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CAMP PENDLETON — Marines and sailors with the 1st Marine Regiment are joining soldiers from the Japanese Defense Force in amphibious reconnaissance and landing operations, live-fire, mortar, artillery and close air support training across bases in Southern California.

On Tuesday, Jan. 15, commanding officers from the Marine Corps and Japanese Defense Force opened Exercise Iron Fist in a ceremony at the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force’s headquarters at Camp Del Mar.

The training, which will continue through Feb. 15, builds on longstanding military ties between the two countries. Participation by the Japanese forces is the largest since the exercise began 13 years ago.

Col. Kevin Clark, commanding officer of the 1st Marine Regiment, welcomed Japanese commanders during the ceremony, including Colonel Takayuki Makise, commander of 1st Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade.

“Exercise Iron Fist is extremely valuable to the Japanese and U.S. military,” Clark said. “Our units frequently train together both here and in Japan, but this year is special because it involves the 1st Marine Regiment and includes more robust Japanese capabilities.”

It is the first time in Exercise Iron Fist that the Japanese Ground Self-Defense Force will use its own Amphibious Assault Vehicles.

Iron Fist is designed to improve the ability of the U.S. Marine Corps and Japanese force to plan, communicate and conduct combined amphibious operations.

“It has been exciting to watch the Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade develop over the past several years from a small experimental unit to a modern amphibious force, capably led and ready to meet any requirement,” Clark said.

The training is planned at Camp Pendleton, San Clemente Island and Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms.

“Our close U.S.-Japan partnership contributes to regional stability, and by working together, we are better able to respond to crises,” Clark said. “For more than 55 years, the United States and Japan have been treaty allies, which serves as a cornerstone for peace and security in the Western Pacific.”

This article is written by Erika I. Ritchie from Orange County Register and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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Two Marines Injured After Anti-Tank Weapon Mishap at Infantry Officer Course

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A Marine student and an instructor both sustained injuries last week during a live-fire training accident at the Corps’ Infantry Officer Course in Quantico, Virginia, the service confirmed.

The incident took place Jan. 9 around 11 a.m. during the firing of an M72 Light Anti-Tank Weapon, officials with Marine Corps Training Command said in a statement. The mishap was first reported by Marine Corps Times.

Both the student officer and the instructor-staff member were transported to an unidentified local hospital to treat minor injuries, Training Command officials said.

“Firing the LAW is a routine scheduled event required as part of the Training Command school’s program of instruction,” they said in the statement. “The safety of our Marines is a top priority.”

While an investigation has been opened into the incident, officials said there is no current indication of negligence or misconduct by Marines during the training.

The M72 rocket-launcher has been used by the Army and Marine Corps since the Vietnam War. A man-portable system, it fires a 66 mm round with an effective range of roughly 200 meters. The system is subject to backblast, a pressure-caused phenomenon that creates a danger zone of 15 meters or more behind the weapon.

An upgraded version of the system reportedly under consideration by the Marine Corps would eliminate backblast and improve the system’s stability and lethality.

— Hope Hodge Seck can be reached at hope.seck@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @HopeSeck.

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SpecOps Recruiting Squadron Helps Air Force Combat ‘Runaway Attrition’

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With the help of a new recruiting squadron, the U.S. Air Force is getting a better sense of what type of airmen are needed for the next dynamic conflict.

The service established its first Special Operations Recruiting Squadron last year to find next-generation combat airmen. Recruiters and mentors train the airmen in a step-by-step, streamlined program, explained Maj. Heath Kerns, commander of the 330th Recruiting Squadron, headquartered at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas.

“We needed a different answer to the runaway attrition,” Kerns said in an interview with Military.com last week.

While each of the Air Force specialty code varies, the average attrition rate in the special operations community hovered around 80 percent throughout initial selection and training just a few years ago.

“This was a decision to go with a different model to focus on quality, so it’s the first step of what is now a comprehensive change from initial ascensions all the way to training … and operations as well,” he said.

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The Air Force had already identified recruiters in 2017 to focus on special operations and combat support recruiting. The 330th Recruiting Squadron was stood up June 29, 2018, according to Air Education and Training Command (AETC).

The squadron has 120 airmen and and 12 flight chiefs spread across the U.S., all focused on bringing special warfare and combat support recruits into the ranks. Previously, an airman would be assessed by a traditional recruiter, head to Basic Military Training (BMT) and go on to the indoctrination course from there.

But airmen now get a firsthand glimpse of what their duties will be like, with recruiters and mentors by their side a few times a month.

“Our recruiters find them, and then work with them [and] with our developers,” Kerns said.

Developers are airmen who previously served in one of the six specialties — combat controllers; pararescuemen; special operations weather technicians; tactical air control party; survival, evasion, resistance, and escape (SERE); and explosive ordnance disposal airmen (EOD) — and wanted to serve as coaches or mentors to candidates entering the unit.

SERE and EOD are considered combat support, while pararescue (PJ), combat controller, special operations weather technician (SOWT), and tactical air control party (TACP) are considered special operations, AETC said.

“They know what it takes to thrive in those jobs and then also just help [the recruits] so they understand what they’re getting into and prepare them mentally and physically,” Kerns said.

They stress working together as a team, he said. But also, “Can they lead? Can they endure difficult circumstances … and come back for more?”

AETC and Air Force Special Operations Command have brought in mental health and physical fitness coaches who are designing the recruit training, “to make them healthier, faster, better, stronger,” AETC commander Lt. Gen. Steven Kwast said last year.

Special operations recruiters assess candidates for specialized training through the developers to hone their skills. The recruits then continue to BMT and the Special Warfare Preparatory Course.

According to AETC, the prep is a seven-week course designed to ensure candidates are prepared as much as possible for the two-year training pipeline of the various special operations careers. Once in that pipeline, airmen undergo some of the most grueling technical training in the U.S. military.

The Air Force hasn’t deviated in what it’s looking for: airmen who present an aptitude for the high-stress battlefield career, as well as those eager to maintain physical fitness and healthy lifestyles.

“We’re just trying to be realistic with them from the very beginning,” added Master Sgt. Michael Williams, a flight chief with the 330th. “Our candidates, whenever we bring them into our program … we can usually have them ready, passing the physical fitness standards, depending on their mental capacity … and resiliency, in about three to four months.”

It’s also about “focusing more on what we have in common than the specialties that make us separate,” Kerns said.

The squadron shipped out roughly 1,000 special operator candidates to BMT in 2018, he said, adding that it’s too early to tell if the unit has had an effect on the overall attrition rate in those career fields.

But he said there have been production increases, including a 20 to 24 percent increase in the number of candidates moving into the combat controller and special operations weather technician initial production rate and course.

Kerns said the focus is more on quality than quantity of recruits.

The 330th has also helped women with an interest in special operations.

The 330th has had 12 female candidates since Oct. 1, 2017 — six SERE, four EOD, 1 TACP, and one SOWT, according to AETC spokeswoman Jennifer Gonzalez.

Five of those women — three EOD and two SERE — were recently recruited and have moved on this fiscal year.

“We cannot say with certainty if these females are currently in the training pipeline, as some may have self-eliminated or gotten injured,” Gonzalez said.

There are currently 17 female applicants in development and working with their recruiter, she said.

“We want to build a better candidate at the end of the day,” said Master Sgt. Daniel Jones of the Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape Specialist Screening Course at the 66th Training Squadron, Detachment 3, at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

Jones helps oversee the initial entry for SERE courses a candidate would take after his or her time at the 330th.

“And what we’ve seen is a higher success rate in the initial physical standards test” since the 330th’s inception, he said. “They’re in better overall physical shape.”

Physical conditioning aside, the goal is to give new airmen the proper idea of what it takes to be in a high-intensity career field.

“It’s the airman that’s making it happen,” Kerns said, referring to combat skills on the ground.

“Being ground operators in the Air Force — we find ourselves at the center of all activity — you bring the might of [the Air Force] to the joint battle,” he said. “You’re connecting all the dots. Since we’re always in the center, always in the chaos and having to be the calm through that storm … it’s the [airmen] that are going to start making things happen.”

— Oriana Pawlyk can be reached at oriana.pawlyk@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @Oriana0214.

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Mechanical Issues Cause Back-to-Back F-15 Emergency Landings in Kadena

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Two F-15 Eagles from Kadena Air Base, Japan, experienced mechanical issues and were forced to make emergency landing using arresting cables, the Air Force told Military.com Wednesday.

One of the F-15s had a problem with its landing gear and the other “experienced a hydraulic issue,” said Air Force Capt. Victoria Hight, spokeswoman for Pacific Air Forces.

The jets were returning to Kadena when the incident occurred Tuesday, Hight said in an email.

“Both pilots followed proper procedures and landed the aircraft safely without incident,” she said.

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Various media outlets noted that the jets landed on the same runway, but in the opposite direction of one another. The news was first reported by the Okinawa Times.

The separate incidents have not forced the base to order a stand-down of its fleet, Hight added. The base flies F-15C/D models.

“Our airmen are well-trained to execute their missions under any conditions, and they handled this particular incident in a professional, safe manner,” the spokeswoman said.

In July, the base paused all F-15 flying operations after a pilot crashed off Okinawa during a routine training flight.

The lone pilot “successfully ejected” and was rescued by the Japan Air Self-Defense Force.

— Oriana Pawlyk can be reached at oriana.pawlyk@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @oriana0214.

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Air Force Study Shows Wrench-Turners Make Better Cyber Warriors

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The U.S. Air Force is learning that wrench-turners, not computer geeks, may make ideal cyber warriors, National Guard Bureau cyber officials said Thursday.

“We tend to be very linear in our thinking sometimes — that you have to have a computer science degree; you have to come from a computer background; and that is what makes a good cyber operator,” Air Force Col. Jori Robinson, vice commander of the Maryland Air National Guard’s 175th Wing, told a group of reporters at the Pentagon on Thursday.

The Air Force is studying “what actually makes somebody have a capacity — not necessarily the ability right now, but a capacity — to learn cyberspace operations,” Robinson said.

“So there have been some studies recently that are showing that, hey … that person is over in maintenance, that person has been turning wrenches on a jet for the past 15 years. They actually have the capacity and the innate ability to understand networks and get a better idea, and they are turning out to make some of the most prolific and fantastic operators that we have,” she said.

“We took some of our maintainers and turned them into cyber operators, and they are just crushing all of these classes. They are the most sought-after folks from Cyber Command to come and sit on these teams,” Robinson said.

Air Force Lt. Col. Jody Ogle, J6 director of communications and cyber programs for the West Virginia National Guard, said his state has already experienced success from the effort when the 167th Air Wing recently began converting from the C-5 Galaxy to the C-17 Globemaster.

“C-17s don’t require as many maintainers as C-5s, so there was a net loss of people,” Ogle said.

Using workforce development grant money, “we put them through civilian education, and it was met with great success,” he said, adding that roughly 50 maintainers went into cyber-related jobs.

“Cyber isn’t always defense,” Ogle said. “There is an [information technology] side of that too — you build the domain. …. When you think of cyber, you’ve got to think of those who maintain your IT systems as well.”

The Air National Guard currently has seven network warfare squadrons, two information operations squadrons, one information aggressor squadron and a small number of other cyber-capable units.

The Army National Guard is establishing a Cyber Brigade with five cyber battalions; 10 cyber protection teams, one in each of the Federal Emergency Management regions; five cyber support companies; and five cyber warfare companies under state authority by fiscal 2022.

The National Guard Bureau currently has 3,880 cyber warriors, and “we are building out all of our units, all of the training, so by 2022 we should be fully mission capable across all the units and the skill sets,” said Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Burkett, vice director of domestic operations for the National Guard Bureau.

“We see the future is bright for the National Guard … and we definitely embrace the best talent that’s out there to join our ranks and be part of a very cutting-edge mission that is absolutely necessary for the survival of our country,” he said.

— Matthew Cox can be reached at matthew.cox@military.com.

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